September 27, 2022
Mechanisms of Nanotechnology
Mechanisms of Nanotechnology

Nanotechnology can be defined as the science and engineering concerned with the design, synthesis, characterization and application of materials and devices with the smallest functional organization in at least one dimension on the nanometre scale, or billionths of a meter. At this scale, consideration of individual molecules and interacting groups of molecules becomes important with respect to the bulk macroscopic properties of materials or devices. This is because we can control the macroscopic chemical and physical properties by controlling the underlying molecular structure. Nanotechnology has found many applications in medicine, and this article briefly describes these applications.

These materials and devices have a high degree of functional specificity and can be designed to interact with cells and tissues at the molecular (i.e. subcellular) level for applications in the fields of medicine and physiology, thus not allowing a degree of integration between the technology and biological systems. not. It can be achieved before. Nanotechnology is not a single emerging field of science in itself, but rather a collection of different traditional sciences, such as chemistry, physics, materials science, and biology, bringing together the collective expertise needed to develop these novels. technology. The promise of nanotechnology is multifaceted and offers not only improvements to current technology, but entirely new tools and capabilities.

Nanoparticle probes could endow imaging technologies with improved signal sensitivity, better spatial resolution, and the ability to convey information about biological systems at the molecular and cellular levels. These magnetic nanoparticles can serve as a key platform for adding other functional moieties, including fluorescent tags, radionuclides, and other biomolecules, for multimodal imaging, gene delivery, and cell trafficking. (MRI) using hybrid probes of magnetic nanoparticles and adenovirus can detect target cells and optically monitor gene delivery and expression of green fluorescent protein.